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Galinn Karisson

Open Discussion: The Battle of Austerlitz

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In the Battle of Austerlitz (2 December 1805), part of the Napoleonic Wars against the Third Coalition, a French army of approximately 68,000 troops under Napoleon's command decisively defeated a joint Russo-Austrian army of over 89,000 troops, commanded by Russian General Kutuzov and Austrian General von Weyrother. The battle was followed by the signing of the Treaty of Pressburg, and the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire. Austerldiitz (the modern town of Slavkov u Brna in the Czech Republic) lies approximately 20 km away from Brno.

 

The Battle of Austerlitz took place on the 2 December 1805, exactly one year after Napoleon's crowning as Emperor of the French. It was the next and final step in his "Campaign of Austria" against the Austrians and Russians, after Napoleon's significant victory over the Austrian General Mack at Ulm. In an unprecedented rapid concentration of French forces, Napoleon essentially had defeated Mack by manoeuvre, resulting in the surrender of a major Austrian army protecting the northern approach to Vienna, and subsequently leading to the capture of the Austrian capital.

 

Napoleon had been seeking a decisive engagement for a few days, which the Austro-Russians were trying to avoid, since Kutusov was awaiting the arrival of important reinforcements. After reconnaissance had explored the field in the end of November, Napoleon manoeuvred in such a way as to let the road to Vienna be cut by Austro-Russian forces. As they felt in a adventageous position, the Austro-Russian army engaged the French forces at the Pratzen (also Prace) Heights. As the Austro-Russian were closing, Napoleon abandoned this strategically advantageous position to his enemy.

 

The Battle of Austerlitz, by Lejeune. In the morning of the 2 December, the Austro-Russians were occupying the Pratzen Heights, oriented North-South, with two corps of army, one of them being the centre of the coalised forces, and the other, the left wing. The Russians formed the right wing. In front of them were two French corps of army, facing the centre and the right wing of the Austro-Russian forces; the French right wing, under command of Davout, was stll on its way in the morning of the battle. Its first elements arrived one hour before sunset.

 

Seeing the weakness of the French right flank, the two Austrian corps of army marched down South as to surround the French army with an enveloping move. The still incomplete corps of army of Davout sustained the shock of the attack.

 

When the Austrian centre was far enough, Napoleon had his 17 000 man strong centre, under Soult, climb the Pratzen Heights. Kutuzov's army was expecting French counterattacks to be flanking side manoeuvres, was surprised at the frontal attack, and eventually, had to surrender the centre after heavy fighting. The French centre then attacked the flank of the moving Austrian left flank, and continued attacking the right flank of the Russo-Austrian across the Heights. The attack disbanded the Austrian corps, which ended up on the frozen lake at the South, and cut the Austrians from the Russian forces, which Kutusov had retreating in order, as to avoid the danger.

 

The French suffered 9,000 casualties and the Russo-Austrian army lost about 25,000 men, killed, wounded or captured. Eventually, the Russians withdrew from Austria, and the Austrians signed the Treaty of Pressburg (26 December 1805), which ended the Holy Roman Empire, and recognised the sovereignty of France over Italy.

 

The battle became one of the most famous battles for its strategy and communications. Afterward, Napoleon said one of his most famous discourses

 

50 flags were taken from the Austro-Russians and were displayed at the church of Saint Louis des Invalides in Paris. The bronze of the 180 captured cannons would be used to build the Colonne Vendôme on the Place Vendôme

 

Napoleon's command post was a small hill, where an orientation table with the positions of the different armies is now installed. A few tens of square metres around are French territory.

 

Considered by the Emperor Napoleon I himself to be his greatest victory (to which I agree).

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Good Afternoon To You, Your Holiness,

 

What an AMAZING command of Military History You have, Your Holiness!!! . . .

 

This is truly MAGNIFICENT!!! . . . .

 

Have an absolutely splendiferous afternoon . . . forthwith . . .

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Good Afternon To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

This Battle of Austerlitz was a complex one, and I do believe that Napoleon came out looking very good because of His Strategy . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful afternoon . . . forthwith . . .

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Good Evening To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

That is one of the reasons why Napoleon was remembered - so many of his Battle Strategies were tremendous!!! . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful evening . . . forthwith . . .

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Indeed! Napoleon is one of my favorite commanders because he had both genius and total command. He could handle any situation with complete calm, and could go on for days without sleep or rest, and complete great tasks.

 

His strategy has to be one of the best ever pulled off. The idea of splitting the enemy, concentration of forces, the Battalion Carre ("square battalion"), etc. It's something that has rarley been seen in world history.

 

Also, the fact that he was such a great administator furthers his genius. He could fight a whole campaign, and still look after France, and his many holdings and alliances with abosolute resolution and control.

 

However, I believe Napoleon did not fall because he was outfoxed, or was out-manouvered. I simply think he was tired. Imagine fighting in horrid combat for 20 years, rarley getting a good night's sleep, constantly battling to hold on to your Empire, looking after HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of soldiers, not to mention 20 million rebellious Frenchmen and women. It has been pointed out that when Napoleon made huge mistakes, it was simply because he was too fatigued to listen to any one else. Also, the fact that he was obsessed with his omnipotnce did not help.

 

Yet, I believe that he was the greatest commander in military history, before, during, and since. And the Battle of Austerlitz expemplifes this by the fact that he did not fight battles to fight them; he fought to WIN them!

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Good Evening To You, Your Majesty of Nidaros,

 

Yes, I totally agree with You . . .

 

Napoleon was simply tired . . . that is a logical and quick explanation of His Unfortunate Downfall . . .

 

His Strategies were Tremendous . . .

 

I have read of Battle Strategies before, but His Strategies were Phenomenal, to say the least!!! . . .

 

He was definitely a Memorable Military Giant, both During His Time, and in ongoing Military Historical Times . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful evening . . . forthwith . . .

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Good Evening To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

Napoleon was definitely One of the Most Dynamic Leaders of History!!! . . .

 

He was a Tremendous Military Force who will remain a Solid Figure to be remembered for All Time!!! . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful evening . . . forthwith . . .

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Indeed. He is one of the greatest (in my opinion greatest) commanders in military history, and a truly modern man. He was ahead of his time, and at the same time, perfect.

 

(And here's a little known fact: Only one "person" has had more books written about himself than Napoleon. Who is it? Think back 2,000 years...)

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Good Afternoon To You, Your Holiness,

 

Are You asking the Question from a Military Standpoint??? . . .

 

Or is Your question: Who is the person who had more books written about Him than Napoleon??? . . .

 

If Your question is not strictly from a Military Viewpoint, then I would have to say that perhaps that Person might be Jesus Christ??? . . .

 

From a Militray Viewpoint, Oh, I am not sure at all . . .

 

There are so many Marvellous Candidates!!! . . .

 

General Robert Edeward Lee would definitely be one . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful afternoon . . . forthwith . . .

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No, in fact, it is not from a military standpoint. In fact, Dame Ragnhild, you nailed it on the head. Jesus Christ is the only human being to surpass the amount of literatue of Napoleon. Shows the true worth of a man!

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Good Evening To You, Your Holiness,

 

Yes, I would definitely agree with You . . .

 

Jesus Christ was the Total Epitome of a Human Being . . .

 

He was, in essence, the Perfect Man . . .

 

And He most assuredly deserves every book that was ever written about Him . . .

 

Thank You Very Much, Your Holiness . . .

 

I am very Gratified to know the answer to Your Question . . .

 

If my memory serves me correctly, My Daddy and I had a huge discussion about that very same subject years ago, and he also told me that answer . . .

 

I think I mentioned that My Daddy was a Minister, so my childhood was totally steeped in religious training . . .

 

I have always been interested in History, and such . . .

 

And I do have some books about Military History . . .

 

Have a most thoughtful evening . . . forthwith . . .

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No, in fact, it is not from a military standpoint. In fact, Dame Ragnhild, you nailed it on the head. Jesus Christ is the only human being to surpass the amount of literatue of Napoleon. Shows the true worth of a man!

 

Indeed. I didnt really know that, wow. (Apologies for reviving the old post)

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Good Evening To You My Gentle Friends,

 

Well, that just proves that Jesus Christ and the Life that He Led gave a Supreme Example, which was written about in SO many different books . . .

 

True, there are Absolutely Magnificent Military Historical Figures who have been given Fabulous Biographical Personifications . . . And This is Rightly To Be Commended . . .

 

However, Jesus Christ has been a Religious Leader, Teacher, Friend, Mentor, and He gave freely of His Time, Talent, and Teachings that those of us on this Earth might Benefit from everything which He had to offer . . .

 

It is no wonder that He was written about in such a Prolific Manner . . .

 

Have A Most Splendiferous Evening . . . Forthwith . . .

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