Jump to content
The High Realm of Stormark
Sign in to follow this  
Galinn Karisson

Landmarks of Sicilia

Recommended Posts

This thread will be devoted to the various sights and landmarks which dot the various cities and regions of Sicilia.

 

Note: Sicilia is pronounced with a hard "c" and thus "Sicilian" is pronounced "Si-k-lian" or as the natives say "Si-chi-lian."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Cathedral of Messina

 

Built under the supervision of Rudulfus the Wise in the thirteenth century, the Cathedral of Messina is a prime example of Norse-Sicilian architecture. Rudulfus, the first Norman Count of Sicilia to be baptized at birth, ordered that the Cathedral contain elements of the castles of his Norse youth, while combining aspects of the Sicilian natives, who were both Christian and Muslim. It is said that upon its completion, Rudulfus would stand on the same spot in the Cathedral tower looking towards the sea, yearning for the land of his youth; indeed, there is today a set of bronzed footsteps marking the spot. Because of this, the Cathedral hosts an annual mass and celebration in honor of sailors and merchants known as Rudulfmas.

 

Cathedral Exterior:

 

duomo.jpg

 

Cathedral Interior:

 

345930896_2ecd59226f_o.jpg

 

Courtyard:

 

monreale.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Vigne di Ragnar (The Vineyards of Ragnar)

 

Located near Capua, the Vineyards of Ragnar were established in the wake of the first Norman incursion into Sicilia by Ragnar Sindrisson, brother of the Duke of Normandie. Although used to the mead of his Viking homeland, Ragnar was offered a glass of Capuian wine by the feudal lords of the region, wine which had been cultivated by Sicilians for nearly a thousand years before his arrival. As he tasted the wine, Ragnar immediately ordered that the vineyards would be protected from any molestation and declared that a portion of the wine would be sent to Norman homeland.

 

cc.jpg

 

italian-vineyard.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Torre Ascoli

 

Ascoli Tower is a Norman-Sicilian fortress in the outskirts of Ascoli. It was constructed by Hakon Ragnarsson, the eldest child of Ragnar Sindrisson and first Count of Sicilia in mid-twelfth century. Ascoli was chosen by Ragnar as a permanent Norse capital due to its location and its small size compared to Messina, but he died before he could take up residence in the town and assume the title of Count. As a result, and to defend against native Sicilian revolts and assaults, Hakon ordered a fortification built to ensure the permanent presence of Viking influence.

 

3661441871_46e8465a8e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ancient Ruins of Messina

 

Located a few miles outside of Messina, these ruins represent the historic past of the Sicilian people. Archaeologists from Haldarsvik University have discovered that these ruins, dated around 2,000 years old, represent the Larissans, a archaic Hellenic tribe, who had arrived in the Sicilian islands around 2,400 year ago. Among the ruins are the Temple of Neptune, an amphitheater which likely seated nearly 1500 people, and the ancient agora, indicating the site's status as a cultural center away from the pressures of Messina.

 

The Amphitheater:

 

sicily.jpg

 

The Temple of Neptune:

 

1303210488_14ac781395_o.jpg

 

The Agora:

 

40098-004-83B91D5B.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The High Queen Asa Mosque of Messina

 

Constructed nearly one hundred years before the first Norman contact in the Sicilia, the Emir Ali Mosque was built during the brief period of Muslim rule. Named for the most notable of the Sicilian Muslim rulers, it is said to have inspired the designs of buildings across the County of Sicilia. Despite the Norman conquest, the conversion of a small group of the Norman invasion force to Islam caused successive Counts to order the mosque and its community to be free from violence and molestation. It remains the main mosque of the small Muslim community of Sicilia, but has become a symbol of Sicilian and later Stormarkian tolerance, signified by its renaming for the late High Queen Asa.

 

Sicily%20samples_22.jpg

 

Sicily%20samples_20.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Palazzo Palatine

 

Located in the city of Venosa, it served as the summer residence of the Counts of Sicilia, and currently serves as the summer residence of the Jarl. It was constructed during the late-twelfth century and utilized Sicilian and Muslim architects in its building.

 

palazzo%20dei%20normanni.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Giuseppe Trevini Monument

 

Located in Aversa, the statue was erected shortly before the Stormarkian acquisition of Normandie and Sicilia. It represents the Sicilian hero Giuseppe Trevini who led an unsuccessful rebellion during the 19th Century to gain Sicilian independence from the Duchy of Normandie. Despite his defeat and exile, Trevini remained a folk hero amongst the mass of Sicilians due to his deep sense of Sicilian nationalism, his commitment to equality, and his defiance in the face of superior forces; the rebellion itself lasted three years despite Norman forces outnumbering Sicilian rebels six to one. It is said that Trevini's rebellion sparked the mafioso which operated freely in Sicilia until the late twentieth century as opposition to Norman rule.

 

3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Castello d'Aoife

 

One of the first structures built by the Norman conquerers after their final expulsion of the forces of the Sicilian Emir, the Castle was built as the headquarters of the Counts of Sicilia. It has sustained several assaults over the years, yet has remained unconquered for the entirety of its existence. Today it serves as the residence of the Jarl of Sicilia, and was remaimed for the wife of the current Jarl and the Krónjarla of Stormark, Lady Aoife. It is notable for its pure Norman style of construction rather than a Sicilian-Muslim bend.

 

norman-castle-at-erice.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The University of Messina

 

Founded in 1432 by Count Roger IV of Sicilia, the University of Messina was established as a school for the children of nobleman to be taught by learned priests of the Cathedral of Messina. Despite its early role as a type of preparatory school it grew into a center of learning and classical studies, collecting volumes of Sicilian, Hellenic, Islamic, and even Norse literature and history. During the next few centuries it was able to boast the education of nearly every Count of Sicilia, several Norman nobleman, even two Dukes of Normandie, as well as generals, high clergymen, writers, and mathematicians. During the 19th Century, the University of Messina served as a hub of the nationalist and Romantic movements in Sicilia, as well as movements to increase democratic rule in the provinces in the 20th Century. As of the present day, the University of Messina boasts some of the best academics in Stormark outside of the heartland, and has become renowned for its departments of history, law, mathematics, medicine, and literature.

 

2940564743_99880aee26.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Casetta d'Ragnar

 

On March 2, 1098, Ragnar Sindrisson landed near Capua and planted his sword on the beach outside the city. Sent by his brother Duke Richard I of Normandie, Rangar was order to scout Sicilia and determine whether the Saracens could be expelled from the islands and the mainland. Upon reaching the island, Rangar instead attacked the city in full Norse fashion and within three weeks of landing expelled the forces of the Emir of Sicilia from the city. Instead of camping in the lavish palaces of Capua, Ragnar prefered to stay in his modest camp on the area in which he landed. His son Hakon ordered that the area be preserved, and that a statue be erected in his memory. Every March 2, Capuans gather in the ruins of the camp and celebrate Ragnar's victory with parades, bonfires, fireworks, dances, and feasts.

 

The Camp Proper:

 

mesopotam_fortifications.jpg

 

The Statue of Ragnar:

 

rogernorman.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Palazzo Liberta

 

Built as a residence for visits by the Duke of Normandie in the sixteenth century, the Palazzo Liberta, or Palace of Liberty, serves as the seat of the Løgthing, the legislature of the Jarldom of Sicilia, as well as the offices of the Jarldom administration. It served alternately over the years as a city hall, dance hall, vacation lodge, and even a stable for the Sicilian Count during years of dilapidation. Notably, it served as the meeting place for National Assembly of the brief Sicilian Republic during the Trevini Rebellion, and as the seat of the County Assembly in the last years of Norman rule.

 

alure.1245709187.ducezio-palace-xtown-hallx.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you very much, Your Majesty, and also Lady Gudrun. :)

 

You're welcome, Jarl Galinn.

 

There will be much more to come in the future.

 

I'm very much looking forward to that.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We want more! We want more! We want more! :party:

 

Indeed! :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jarl Galinn,

 

You might, in future, make StorWiki articles about the landmarks in this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once I get things under control (i.e. grad school applications, class, etc.) I plan on turning the passing details of these landmarks into a brief narrative history. I also need to do some research so I can produce both an accurate and a colorful history involving Norman, Italian, and Arab history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You send in your grades and test scores, as well as an essay or personal statement, and usually two letters of recommendation.

 

Have you already secured your letters of recommendation?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×