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Polten

Battle of the golden spurs

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Stormarkians,

 

Below is the link to a website where the battle of the golden spurs is described. I won't paste the text in here, we'd lose the images.

 

Besides the political consequences (The county was not incorporated in the kingdom of France) there are 2 singularities:

 

It was the first time ever that an army of knights was defeated by footsoldiers and it was the first time that no prisoners were taken. All French knights were slaughtered. In those days, it was customary to make prisoners and to release them for ransom. Here the Flemish chose to kill everybody, partly to impress the enemy, partly to render them powerless for some time.

 

Here's the link: Battle of the golden spurs

 

Every year, on 11 july, we remember the battle as we made it our national Holiday. So next week, drinks are on the house. Be there!

 

cheers.gifcheers.gifcheers.gifcheers.gif

 

Polten

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Good Morning To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

Remember July 11th!!! . . .

 

Mark the date in Your Calendars!!! . . .

 

Put a Post-It-Note on Your Forehead!!! . . .

 

Did I hear someone mention Drinks??? . . .

 

Wonderful!!! . . .

 

Ah Yes - There's Nothing Like Chilled Champagne!!! . . .

 

Have A Most Splendiferous Morning . . . Forthwith . . .

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Hey!!! I like france! je peux parle le francais... et je le adore!

'parle' peut-être, mais l'écrire paraît être plustôt problématique.

evil1.gif

 

I may have serious problems with those who have exploited our people but it doesn't mean that I don't appreciate their language and culture!!

 

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Good Evening To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

I appreciate the French Language and Culture, too . . .

 

It is C'est Magnifique!!! . . .

 

Tres Chic!!! . . .

 

However, I must admit that my French leaves a lot to be desired . . .

 

Have A Most Splendiferous Evening . . . Forthwith . . .

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'parle' peut-être, mais l'écrire paraît être plustôt problématique.

 

 

I may have serious problems with those who have exploited our people but it doesn't mean that I don't appreciate their language and culture!!

 

Aye, it is a bit problematic, but i still love it! smile.gif

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Question by Kleber :

What is the impossible ?

 

Reply by Napoleon Bonaparte :

The word impossible has no place in my vocabulary. Nor should it have in yours. We have already pushed back the limits of humain capability and now we begin in earnest. Glory awaits us. I suggest we do not keep it waiting.

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Question by Kleber :

What is the impossible ?

 

Reply by Napoleon Bonaparte :

The word impossible has no place in my vocabulary. Nor should it have in yours. We have already pushed back the limits of humain capability and now we begin in earnest. Glory awaits us. I suggest we do not keep it waiting.

 

Hello good sir! and Welcome to the Imperial Academy of Stormark. Napoleon was certainly sure of what he was doing, thats what i like about him.

 

sincerely,

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Good Morning To You, My Gentle Friends,

 

Well, God Bless Napoleon!!! . . .

 

Nothing like the Power Of Positive Thinking to help in All Matters of Life!!! . . .

 

Have A Msot Splendiferous Morning . . . Forthwith . . .

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--- the little corporal ---

 

Napoleon earned his nickname “le petit caporal” at Lodi, when he personally sighted some of the cannon during the battle, a task usually reserved for an artillery corporal.

 

The Paris society cruelly nicknamed him "Puss in Boots".

 

 

 

 

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he just had some crappy Marshals with him at Waterloo

You're doing the man wrong here. He was a true master in placing the right man at the right place.

He was a excellent military leader, one of the best ever, there's no doubt about it. But a lot of his success is due to his speed of his action. The man was able to move (the soldiers walked!!) an army across Europe, and be there before the 'hometeam' was ready for them. Just try to imagine what it takes to move an army and don't forget: no phone or other instant communication. He must have had an excellent organisation and that is what makes the man a great leader.

 

But a final defeat is the fate of one who wants to conquer the world. It may take a lot of time, but the ennemies will get together and they will stop him. When they are late, it will be on the battle field, when they are in time, it will be an anonymous sniper, an 'accident' or whatever.

 

 

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he must have had an excellent organisation and that is what makes the man a great leader.

 

Indeed. The army he took to Russia the 600,000 men werent all french you know... they were from all over his Empire. Talk about excellent communication!

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Do whatever seems to you best...

 

A less than impressive display of leadership by the Little Corporal is encapsulated in this order to Marshal Etienne McDonald, Duke of Tarentum, at the Battle of Wagram. Having just recovered from an embarassing defeat at Aspern-Essling, Napoleon's tactical genius was cleary on leave at Wagram: instead of relying on skilful manoeuvre to gain victory over the Austrians, he ordered McDonald's corps to break straight through the centre of the enemy army; in the end McDonald's command prevailed, but only after suffering 80% casualties from the massed Austrian guns. Napoleon's unhelpful instruction to the distraught Marshal demonstrates how far he had lost control of the battle, which he was lucky to win.

 

Napoleon was a truly great commander, but like all larger-than-life figures it is important not to allow the legend to gloss over his failings. The truth of the matter is that by 1809, Napoleon was ageing, tired, and beginning to show the first signs of the deterioration of his health that was to mar his performance in later years. His victories after this date, whilst still notable, lacked the flair of his earlier campaigns, and were inevitably more costly in terms of casualties. Although he regained his vigour in the defence of France in 1814, by that stage it was already too late: his opponents were not only more numerous, but had also learned how to deal with the Corsican Ogre. Waterloo was merely the inevitable conclusion to this slow decline.

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